Vitamin D is What’s for Dinner

In the throws of gloomy winter days, it is hard to get enough natural sunlight so that we can soak up vitamin D. Fortunately there are other ways to get this rich nutrient our body craves and that is through the foods we eat. Foods such as salmon, shrimp, egg yolks, and mushrooms are a way to provide us with the vitamins that we lack around this time of year.

In the throws of gloomy winter days, it is hard to get enough natural sunlight so that we can soak up vitamin D. Fortunately there are other ways to get this rich nutrient our body craves and that is through the foods we eat. Foods such as salmon, shrimp, egg yolks, and mushrooms are a way to provide us with the vitamins that we lack around this time of year.

Vitamin D is important to have in your system because it can contribute to mood. Studies show that a lack of vitamin D can contribute to depression and other mood disorders such as Seasonal Affect Disorder (SAD). There are several ways to combat this deprivation such as light therapy and supplements, however one of the best ways to reintroduce vitamin D back into your system naturally is through the foods you eat. Below you will find a vitamin D rich recipe that is delicious and healthy.

When making any changes in your health routine, especially if you find yourself having abnormal changes in behavior, it is best to consult your therapist and other professionals that can assist you in how to best achieve positive change.

 

Salmon Chowder (http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/252456/salmon-chowder/)

 

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon canola oil

⅓ cup chopped carrot

⅓ cup chopped celery

4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth

1½ cups water

1 12-ounce skinned salmon fillet, preferably wild-caught

2½ cups frozen cauliflower florets, thawed and coarsely chopped

3 tablespoons chopped fresh chives or scallions, or 1½ tablespoons dried chives

1⅓ cups instant mashed potato flakes or 2 cups leftover mashed potatoes

¼ cup chopped fresh dill, or 2 teaspoons dried tarragon

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

¼ teaspoon salt

Freshly ground pepper to taste

Preparation

Active In 30 m/Ready In 30 m

Heat oil in a large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add carrot and celery and cook, stirring frequently, until the vegetables just begin to brown, 3 to 4 minutes. Add broth, water, salmon, cauliflower and chives (or scallions) and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook, maintaining a gentle simmer, until the salmon is just cooked through, 5 to 8 minutes. Remove the salmon to a clean cutting board. Flake into bite-size pieces with a fork. Stir potato flakes (or leftover mashed potatoes), dill (or tarragon) and mustard into the soup until well blended. Return to a simmer. Add the salmon and reheat. Season with salt and pepper.

Notes: Instant mashed potato flakes is not a product that we typically use in our recipes, but we love how it gives creamy texture to soup without adding extra fat. Look for a brand that has the fewest ingredients possible (and therefore little to no artificial additives or flavoring). At our local market, the store brand was the best choice.

Wild-caught salmon from the Pacific (Alaska and Washington) are more sustainably fished and have a larger, more stable population. For more information, visit Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch (mbayaq.org/cr/seafoodwatch.asp).

Tip: To skin a salmon fillet, place on a clean cutting board, skin side down. Starting at the tail end, slip the blade of a long, sharp knife between the fish flesh and the skin, holding the skin down firmly with your other hand. Gently push the blade along at a 30° angle, separating the fillet from the skin without cutting through either.

Nutrition information

Serving size: about 1½ cups

Per serving: 178 calories; 6 g fat(1 g sat); 2 g fiber; 17 g carbohydrates; 17 g protein; 47 mcg folate; 27 mg cholesterol; 2 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 1,395 IU vitamin A; 29 mg vitamin C; 49 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 237 mg sodium; 499 mg potassium

Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (48% daily value), Vitamin A (28% dv)

Carbohydrate Servings: 1

Exchanges: 1 starch, 1 vegetable, 2 lean meat

By Garcsa Brooks

Intern, Olive Branch Counseling Associates, Inc.

Vitamin D is important to have in your system because it can contribute to mood. Studies show that a lack of vitamin D can contribute to depression and other mood disorders such as Seasonal Affect Disorder (SAD). There are several ways to combat this deprivation such as light therapy and supplements, however one of the best ways to reintroduce vitamin D back into your system naturally is through the foods you eat. Below you will find a vitamin D rich recipe that is delicious and healthy.

When making any changes in your health routine, especially if you find yourself having abnormal changes in behavior, it is best to consult your therapist and other professionals that can assist you in how to best achieve positive change.

 

Salmon Chowder (http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/252456/salmon-chowder/)

 

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon canola oil

⅓ cup chopped carrot

⅓ cup chopped celery

4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth

1½ cups water

1 12-ounce skinned salmon fillet, preferably wild-caught

2½ cups frozen cauliflower florets, thawed and coarsely chopped

3 tablespoons chopped fresh chives or scallions, or 1½ tablespoons dried chives

1⅓ cups instant mashed potato flakes or 2 cups leftover mashed potatoes

¼ cup chopped fresh dill, or 2 teaspoons dried tarragon

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

¼ teaspoon salt

Freshly ground pepper to taste

Preparation

Active In 30 m/Ready In 30 m

Heat oil in a large saucepan or Dutch oven over

In the throws of gloomy winter days, it is hard to get enough natural sunlight so that we can soak up vitamin D. Fortunately there are other ways to get this rich nutrient our body craves and that is through the foods we eat. Foods such as salmon, shrimp, egg yolks, and mushrooms are a way to provide us with the vitamins that we lack around this time of year.

Vitamin D is important to have in your system because it can contribute to mood. Studies show that a lack of vitamin D can contribute to depression and other mood disorders such as Seasonal Affect Disorder (SAD). There are several ways to combat this deprivation such as light therapy and supplements, however one of the best ways to reintroduce vitamin D back into your system naturally is through the foods you eat. Below you will find a vitamin D rich recipe that is delicious and healthy.

When making any changes in your health routine, especially if you find yourself having abnormal changes in behavior, it is best to consult your therapist and other professionals that can assist you in how to best achieve positive change.

 

Salmon Chowder (http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/252456/salmon-chowder/)

 

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon canola oil

⅓ cup chopped carrot

⅓ cup chopped celery

4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth

1½ cups water

1 12-ounce skinned salmon fillet, preferably wild-caught

2½ cups frozen cauliflower florets, thawed and coarsely chopped

3 tablespoons chopped fresh chives or scallions, or 1½ tablespoons dried chives

1⅓ cups instant mashed potato flakes or 2 cups leftover mashed potatoes

¼ cup chopped fresh dill, or 2 teaspoons dried tarragon

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

¼ teaspoon salt

Freshly ground pepper to taste

Preparation

Active In 30 m/Ready In 30 m

Heat oil in a large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add carrot and celery and cook, stirring frequently, until the vegetables just begin to brown, 3 to 4 minutes. Add broth, water, salmon, cauliflower and chives (or scallions) and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook, maintaining a gentle simmer, until the salmon is just cooked through, 5 to 8 minutes. Remove the salmon to a clean cutting board. Flake into bite-size pieces with a fork. Stir potato flakes (or leftover mashed potatoes), dill (or tarragon) and mustard into the soup until well blended. Return to a simmer. Add the salmon and reheat. Season with salt and pepper.

Notes: Instant mashed potato flakes is not a product that we typically use in our recipes, but we love how it gives creamy texture to soup without adding extra fat. Look for a brand that has the fewest ingredients possible (and therefore little to no artificial additives or flavoring). At our local market, the store brand was the best choice.

Wild-caught salmon from the Pacific (Alaska and Washington) are more sustainably fished and have a larger, more stable population. For more information, visit Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch (mbayaq.org/cr/seafoodwatch.asp).

Tip: To skin a salmon fillet, place on a clean cutting board, skin side down. Starting at the tail end, slip the blade of a long, sharp knife between the fish flesh and the skin, holding the skin down firmly with your other hand. Gently push the blade along at a 30° angle, separating the fillet from the skin without cutting through either.

Nutrition information

Serving size: about 1½ cups

Per serving: 178 calories; 6 g fat(1 g sat); 2 g fiber; 17 g carbohydrates; 17 g protein; 47 mcg folate; 27 mg cholesterol; 2 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 1,395 IU vitamin A; 29 mg vitamin C; 49 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 237 mg sodium; 499 mg potassium

Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (48% daily value), Vitamin A (28% dv)

Carbohydrate Servings: 1

Exchanges: 1 starch, 1 vegetable, 2 lean meat

By Garcsa Brooks

Intern, Olive Branch Counseling Associates, Inc.

In the throws of gloomy winter days, it is hard to get enough natural sunlight so that we can soak up vitamin D. Fortunately there are other ways to get this rich nutrient our body craves and that is through the foods we eat. Foods such as salmon, shrimp, egg yolks, and mushrooms are a way to provide us with the vitamins that we lack around this time of year.

Vitamin D is important to have in your system because it can contribute to mood. Studies show that a lack of vitamin D can contribute to depression and other mood disorders such as Seasonal Affect Disorder (SAD). There are several ways to combat this deprivation such as light therapy and supplements, however one of the best ways to reintroduce vitamin D back into your system naturally is through the foods you eat. Below you will find a vitamin D rich recipe that is delicious and healthy.

When making any changes in your health routine, especially if you find yourself having abnormal changes in behavior, it is best to consult your therapist and other professionals that can assist you in how to best achieve positive change.

 

Salmon Chowder (http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/252456/salmon-chowder/)

 

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon canola oil

⅓ cup chopped carrot

⅓ cup chopped celery

4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth

1½ cups water

1 12-ounce skinned salmon fillet, preferably wild-caught

2½ cups frozen cauliflower florets, thawed and coarsely chopped

3 tablespoons chopped fresh chives or scallions, or 1½ tablespoons dried chives

1⅓ cups instant mashed potato flakes or 2 cups leftover mashed potatoes

¼ cup chopped fresh dill, or 2 teaspoons dried tarragon

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

¼ teaspoon salt

Freshly ground pepper to taste

Preparation

Active In 30 m/Ready In 30 m

Heat oil in a large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add carrot and celery and cook, stirring frequently, until the vegetables just begin to brown, 3 to 4 minutes. Add broth, water, salmon, cauliflower and chives (or scallions) and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook, maintaining a gentle simmer, until the salmon is just cooked through, 5 to 8 minutes. Remove the salmon to a clean cutting board. Flake into bite-size pieces with a fork. Stir potato flakes (or leftover mashed potatoes), dill (or tarragon) and mustard into the soup until well blended. Return to a simmer. Add the salmon and reheat. Season with salt and pepper.

Notes: Instant mashed potato flakes is not a product that we typically use in our recipes, but we love how it gives creamy texture to soup without adding extra fat. Look for a brand that has the fewest ingredients possible (and therefore little to no artificial additives or flavoring). At our local market, the store brand was the best choice.

Wild-caught salmon from the Pacific (Alaska and Washington) are more sustainably fished and have a larger, more stable population. For more information, visit Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch (mbayaq.org/cr/seafoodwatch.asp).

Tip: To skin a salmon fillet, place on a clean cutting board, skin side down. Starting at the tail end, slip the blade of a long, sharp knife between the fish flesh and the skin, holding the skin down firmly with your other hand. Gently push the blade along at a 30° angle, separating the fillet from the skin without cutting through either.

Nutrition information

Serving size: about 1½ cups

Per serving: 178 calories; 6 g fat(1 g sat); 2 g fiber; 17 g carbohydrates; 17 g protein; 47 mcg folate; 27 mg cholesterol; 2 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 1,395 IU vitamin A; 29 mg vitamin C; 49 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 237 mg sodium; 499 mg potassium

Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (48% daily value), Vitamin A (28% dv)

Carbohydrate Servings: 1

Exchanges: 1 starch, 1 vegetable, 2 lean meat

By Garcsa Brooks

Intern, Olive Branch Counseling Associates, Inc.

medium heat. Add carrot and celery and cook, stirring frequently, until the vegetables just begin to brown, 3 to 4 minutes. Add broth, water, salmon, cauliflower and chives (or scallions) and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook, maintaining a gentle simmer, until the salmon is just cooked through, 5 to 8 minutes. Remove the salmon to a clean cutting board. Flake into bite-size pieces with a fork. Stir potato flakes (or leftover mashed potat

In the throws of gloomy winter days, it is hard to get enough natural sunlight so that we can soak up vitamin D. Fortunately there are other ways to get this rich nutrient our body craves and that is through the foods we eat. Foods such as salmon, shrimp, egg yolks, and mushrooms are a way to provide us with the vitamins that we lack around this time of year.

Vitamin D is important to have in your system because it can contribute to mood. Studies show that a lack of vitamin D can contribute to depression and other mood disorders such as Seasonal Affect Disorder (SAD). There are several ways to combat this deprivation such as light therapy and supplements, however one of the best ways to reintroduce vitamin D back into your system naturally is through the foods you eat. Below you will find a vitamin D rich recipe that is delicious and healthy.

When making any changes in your health routine, especially if you find yourself having abnormal changes in behavior, it is best to consult your therapist and other professionals that can assist you in how to best achieve positive change.

 

Salmon Chowder (http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/252456/salmon-chowder/)

 

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon canola oil

⅓ cup chopped carrot

⅓ cup chopped celery

4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth

1½ cups water

1 12-ounce skinned salmon fillet, preferably wild-caught

2½ cups frozen cauliflower florets, thawed and coarsely chopped

3 tablespoons chopped fresh chives or scallions, or 1½ tablespoons dried chives

1⅓ cups instant mashed potato flakes or 2 cups leftover mashed potatoes

¼ cup chopped fresh dill, or 2 teaspoons dried tarragon

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

¼ teaspoon salt

Freshly ground pepper to taste

Preparation

Active In 30 m/Ready In 30 m

Heat oil in a large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add carrot and celery and cook, stirring frequently, until the vegetables just begin to brown, 3 to 4 minutes. Add broth, water, salmon, cauliflower and chives (or scallions) and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook, maintaining a gentle simmer, until the salmon is just cooked through, 5 to 8 minutes. Remove the salmon to a clean cutting board. Flake into bite-size pieces with a fork. Stir potato flakes (or leftover mashed potatoes), dill (or tarragon) and mustard into the soup until well blended. Return to a simmer. Add the salmon and reheat. Season with salt and pepper.

Notes: Instant mashed potato flakes is not a product that we typically use in our recipes, but we love how it gives creamy texture to soup without adding extra fat. Look for a brand that has the fewest ingredients possible (and therefore little to no artificial additives or flavoring). At our local market, the store brand was the best choice.

Wild-caught salmon from the Pacific (Alaska and Washington) are more sustainably fished and have a larger, more stable population. For more information, visit Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch (mbayaq.org/cr/seafoodwatch.asp).

Tip: To skin a salmon fillet, place on a clean cutting board, skin side down. Starting at the tail end, slip the blade of a long, sharp knife between the fish flesh and the skin, holding the skin down firmly with your other hand. Gently push the blade along at a 30° angle, separating the fillet from the skin without cutting through either.

Nutrition information

Serving size: about 1½ cups

Per serving: 178 calories; 6 g fat(1 g sat); 2 g fiber; 17 g carbohydrates; 17 g protein; 47 mcg folate; 27 mg cholesterol; 2 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 1,395 IU vitamin A; 29 mg vitamin C; 49 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 237 mg sodium; 499 mg potassium

Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (48% daily value), Vitamin A (28% dv)

Carbohydrate Servings: 1

Exchanges: 1 starch, 1 vegetable, 2 lean meat

By Garcsa Brooks

Intern, Olive Branch Counseling Associates, Inc.

oes), dill (or tarragon) and mustard into the soup until well blended. Return to a simmer. Add the salmon and reheat. Season with salt and pepper.

In the throws of gloomy winter days, it is hard to get enough natural sunlight so that we can soak up vitamin D. Fortunately there are other ways to get this rich nutrient our body craves and that is through the foods we eat. Foods such as salmon, shrimp, egg yolks, and mushrooms are a way to provide us with the vitamins that we lack around this time of year.

Vitamin D is important to have in your system because it can contribute to mood. Studies show that a lack of vitamin D can contribute to depression and other mood disorders such as Seasonal Affect Disorder (SAD). There are several ways to combat this deprivation such as light therapy and supplements, however one of the best ways to reintroduce vitamin D back into your system naturally is through the foods you eat. Below you will find a vitamin D rich recipe that is delicious and healthy.

When making any changes in your health routine, especially if you find yourself having abnormal changes in behavior, it is best to consult your therapist and other professionals that can assist you in how to best achieve positive change.

 

Salmon Chowder (http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/252456/salmon-chowder/)

 

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon canola oil

⅓ cup chopped carrot

⅓ cup chopped celery

4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth

1½ cups water

1 12-ounce skinned salmon fillet, preferably wild-caught

2½ cups frozen cauliflower florets, thawed and coarsely chopped

3 tablespoons chopped fresh chives or scallions, or 1½ tablespoons dried chives

1⅓ cups instant mashed potato flakes or 2 cups leftover mashed potatoes

¼ cup chopped fresh dill, or 2 teaspoons dried tarragon

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

¼ teaspoon salt

Freshly ground pepper to taste

Preparation

Active In 30 m/Ready In 30 m

Heat oil in a large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add carrot and celery and cook, stirring frequently, until the vegetables just begin to brown, 3 to 4 minutes. Add broth, water, salmon, cauliflower and chives (or scallions) and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook, maintaining a gentle simmer, until the salmon is just cooked through, 5 to 8 minutes. Remove the salmon to a clean cutting board. Flake into bite-size pieces with a fork. Stir potato flakes (or leftover mashed potatoes), dill (or tarragon) and mustard into the soup until well blended. Return to a simmer. Add the salmon and reheat. Season with salt and pepper.

Notes: Instant mashed potato flakes is not a product that we typically use in our recipes, but we love how it gives creamy texture to soup without adding extra fat. Look for a brand that has the fewest ingredients possible (and therefore little to no artificial additives or flavoring). At our local market, the store brand was the best choice.

Wild-caught salmon from the Pacific (Alaska and Washington) are more sustainably fished and have a larger, more stable population. For more information, visit Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch (mbayaq.org/cr/seafoodwatch.asp).

Tip: To skin a salmon fillet, place on a clean cutting board, skin side down. Starting at the tail end, slip the blade of a long, sharp knife between the fish flesh and the skin, holding the skin down firmly with your other hand. Gently push the blade along at a 30° angle, separating the fillet from the skin without cutting through either.

Nutrition information

Serving size: about 1½ cups

Per serving: 178 calories; 6 g fat(1 g sat); 2 g fiber; 17 g carbohydrates; 17 g protein; 47 mcg folate; 27 mg cholesterol; 2 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 1,395 IU vitamin A; 29 mg vitamin C; 49 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 237 mg sodium; 499 mg potassium

Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (48% daily value), Vitamin A (28% dv)

Carbohydrate Servings: 1

Exchanges: 1 starch, 1 vegetable, 2 lean meat

By Garcsa Brooks

Intern, Olive Branch Counseling Associates, Inc.

Notes: Instant mashed potato flakes is not a product that we typically use in our recipes, but we love how it gives creamy texture to soup without adding extra fat. Look for a brand that has the fewest ingredients possible (and therefore little to no artificial additives or flavoring). At our local market, the store brand was the best choice.

Wild-caught salmon from the Pacific (Alaska and Washington) are more sustainably fished and have a larger, more stable population. For more information, visit Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch (mbayaq.org/cr/seafoodwatch.asp).

Tip: To skin a salmon fillet, place on a clean cutting board, skin side down. Starting at the tail end, slip the blade of a long, sharp knife between the fish flesh and the skin, holding the skin down firmly with your other hand. Gently push the blade along at a 30° angle, separating the fillet from the skin without cutting through either.

Nutrition information

Serving size: about 1½ cups

Per serving: 178 calories; 6 g fat(1 g sat); 2 g fiber; 17 g carbohydrates; 17 g protein; 47 mcg folate; 27 mg cholesterol; 2 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 1,395 IU vitamin A; 29 mg vitamin C; 49 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 237 mg sodium; 499 mg potassium

Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (48% daily value), Vitamin A (28% dv)

Carbohydrate Servings: 1

Exchanges: 1 starch, 1 vegetable, 2 lean meat

 

By Garcsa Brooks

Intern, Olive Branch Counseling Associates, Inc.

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