What Makes You Feel Worthy?

We have all heard of and seen a cow- whether we saw it in a photo or at the zoo. However, many of us have not discussed cows in the context of mental health. Carl Rogers, a psychologist who used a humanistic approach to therapy, developed the concept of conditions of worth, also abbreviated as... Continue Reading →

Hot Cocoa is Good For Your Brain

Could eating chocolate be beneficial for you? Say no more; right? There have been various studies indicating the benefits of specifically, dark chocolate consumption. Flavanols, which are found in dark chocolate and cocoa, may promote human brain function on a longer-term scale. Flavanols are a form of flavonoids, which are plant-based substances that have both... Continue Reading →

Showing Support for Chronic Illness

According to the CDC, six in ten adults in the U.S. have a chronic illness. Chronic illnesses are conditions that require ongoing medical attention or limit activities of daily living. Examples may include cancer, diabetes, Crohn’s disease, and lupus. A chronic diagnosis may create fear and uncertainty, as chronic illnesses are not curable. A person... Continue Reading →

Engaging Mindfulness on Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is traditionally a day to eat delicious comfort food, watch football, and spend time with family. However, sometimes this day produces uncomfortable feelings or situations. Perhaps you have a complicated relationship with food, or perhaps your extended family makes you feel angry. Maybe you are hosting and want to make sure everything is perfect,... Continue Reading →

Spirituality and Religious Coping

Religious beliefs, in some way or another, have touched most of our lives, whether we are deeply involved in a religious institution or have simply referred to God during the pledge of allegiance. Spirituality and religious practices can be big parts of our lives and mostly offer a safe, secure place to land when we... Continue Reading →

Why People Self-Harm

Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), while concerning, is a commonly misunderstood behavior. While it does involve intentional harm to oneself, it does not necessarily mean the act was meant to be life-ending. It can be difficult for some to understand why someone would intentionally want to cause pain to themselves. But once we can empathize how deeply... Continue Reading →

Resolving Ambivalence

The most known definition of ambivalence is having concurrent and contradictory attitudes or feelings toward an object, person, or action. People may have both positive and negative feelings, which cause them to feel stuck or confused. Many people may view themselves as someone who “sees all sides” of situations. There is nothing inherently negative about... Continue Reading →

Secondary Trauma

Social workers, counselors, and educators are just some of the many individuals who spend their careers in service to others. By nature of their work, many helping professionals are exposed to painful, difficult stories and experiences from the people they serve. Secondary trauma has become an “occupational hazard” among helping professionals that is leading to... Continue Reading →

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